Links & Downloads

Titel der Datei Kurzbeschreibung Vorschaubild Eigentliche Datei
100

(copy 1)

What is the amputation process?

Partial foot amputation
What is the amputation process?
read more

What are the various levels of amputation?

Partial foot amputation
What are the various levels of amputation?
read more

What partial foot amputation means for me?

Partial foot amputation
What partial foot amputation means for me?
read more

What is the partial foot amputation process?

Consultation prior to the amputation process

Partnership for success

Your rehabilitation begins even during the planning stage of the partial foot amputation process. This is why cooperation between you and the surgeons, internists, chiropractors, physiotherapists and prosthetists is extremely important. By working together, these specialists can decide on the best type of amputation in your particular case, since this greatly determines what and how much you can do with your foot after surgery.

Cooperation among the experts

The surgeon will usually only see you in the consultation prior to the operation, when the partial foot amputation process will be explained to you. The surgeon's most important task is to conduct the amputation such that you're able to do as much as possible afterwards.

Your own doctor or specialist is responsible for your care following the partial foot amputation itself. After a while, a prosthetist will become involved, who will then be responsible for making your prosthetic or orthotic device.

 

A straightforward operation

A normal process nowadays, the partial foot amputation is conducted under general anaesthetic in a hospital. It's not possible to know in advance how long you'll remain in hospital, as each wound heals differently. However, the progress you make with your movement exercises also has an impact. For more information, please see the section "What happens in the weeks immediately following the amputation?"

The partial foot amputation process

During the amputation process, the surgeon removes only as much tissue as absolutely necessary. This ensures you will be as mobile as possible afterwards. The surgeon incises the skin, removes the diseased tissue and bone, shapes the residual limb and closes the wound. The more healthy tissue is retained, the better. The surgeon also inserts a drain: a small tube for fluid to flow from the wound.

Today, the question isn't how, but rather precisely where the surgeon makes the cut (see "Levels of amputation") and how the residual limb is shaped. This is because the residual limb later has to be capable of bearing weight without developing sores. To enable this, the surgeon "pads" the bone with muscles and leaves sufficient skin for the wound to be sutured without tension. Where possible, the scar is left on the top of the foot, so that it is not subjected to strain and chafing.

Once the amputation process is successfully completed, you can begin planning a normal life with the aid of a partial foot prosthesis.

Subsequent amputations

While it's true that the more of your foot that remains, the better your quality of life, you should be aware of the possible need for a subsequent amputation. Although it may be difficult to believe, this is in your best interest: a subsequent amputation will probably still preserve more tissue than would have been the case twenty years ago.